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Circe

Circe

Inspired.  Lyrical.  Erudite.  Fun.

I have both Madeline Miller's Kindle version and the ASTONISHING companion audible book narrated by Perdita Weeks.  In truth, you will really want both.  I followed along in the Kindle as I listened.  I frequently stopped the narration to luxuriate in one of Miller's translucent passages, reading it over and over again.

Miller's writing and descriptions flow like a stream across waterfall rocks, burbling and splashing and happy.  Bejeweled writing.  Bewitching writing.  

And no one brings that to life as Perdita Weeks does.  

Her quiet, whispery voice; her inflections; her cadences complement Miller's writing in ways that are difficult to explain.  (You'll also appreciate Weeks' pronunciation of myriad Ancient Greek names and places).

Miller (read her bio) has found an unexplored niche in the famous Homeric poems that most of us have read.  She finds those little "throw away" places in the stories and asks, "but why?  What else happened here?"  Women, who usually get short shrift from Homer, are fully formed and fleshed in Miller's addendums.  

Song of Achilles was imaginative, filling in the backstories of Achilles and Patrocles to "round out" the tales where Homer left gaping voids.  

In Circe, however, Miller takes a minor encounter between Circe and Odysseus (at least compared to the 7 year detour he had with Calypso) and, using her detailed knowledge of the stories and of the Greek and Latin languages, constructs compelling and interesting backstories.  In the end, she recasts all the characters in a new, more human light.  

I highly recommend both Miller's book and Weeks audio version as companion pieces.  One without the other is cheating the reader of a truly memorable experience. 

 
Madeline Miller

Madeline Miller

Perdita Weeks

Perdita Weeks

Fobbed Off

Fobbed Off

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